COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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A comparison of the combination of epinephrine and vasopressin with lipid emulsion in a porcine model of asphyxial cardiac arrest after intravenous injection of bupivacaine.

BACKGROUND: In a porcine model, we compared the effect of the combination of vasopressin/epinephrine with that of a lipid emulsion on survival after bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest.

METHODS: After administration of 5 mg/kg of a 0.5% bupivacaine solution i.v., ventilation was interrupted for 2 +/- 0.5 (mean +/- SD) min until asystole occurred. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated after 1 min of untreated cardiac arrest. After 2 min of CPR, 10 animals received, every 5 min, either vasopressin combined with epinephrine or 4 mL/kg of a 20% lipid emulsion. Three minutes after each drug administration, up to three countershocks (4, 4, and 6 J/kg) were administered; all subsequent shocks with 6 J/kg. Blood for determination of the plasma bupivacaine concentration was drawn throughout the experiment.

RESULTS: In the vasopressor group, all five pigs survived, whereas none of five pigs in the lipid group had restoration of spontaneous circulation (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference between groups in the plasma concentration of total bupivacaine.

CONCLUSION: In this model of a bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest, the vasopressor combination of vasopressin and epinephrine compared with lipid emulsion resulted in higher coronary perfusion pressure during CPR and survival rates.

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