JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Acute kidney injury leads to inflammation and functional changes in the brain.

Although neurologic sequelae of acute kidney injury (AKI) are well described, the pathogenesis of acute uremic encephalopathy is poorly understood. This study examined the short-term effect of ischemic AKI on inflammatory and functional changes of the brain in mice by inducing bilateral renal ischemia for 60 min and studying the brains 24 h later. Compared with sham mice, mice with AKI had increased neuronal pyknosis and microgliosis in the brain. AKI also led to increased levels of the proinflammatory chemokines keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant and G-CSF in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus and increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes in the cortex and corpus callosum. In addition, extravasation of Evans blue dye into the brain suggested that the blood-brain barrier was disrupted in mice with AKI. Because liver failure also leads to encephalopathy, ischemic liver injury was induced in mice with normal renal function; neuronal pyknosis and glial fibrillary acidic protein expression were not increased, suggesting differential effects on the brain depending on the organ injured. For evaluation of the effects of AKI on brain function, locomotor activity was studied using an open field test. Mice subjected to renal ischemia or bilateral nephrectomy had moderate to severe declines in locomotor activity compared with sham-operated mice. These data demonstrate that severe ischemic AKI induces inflammation and functional changes in the brain. Targeting these pathways could reduce morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients with severe AKI.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app