REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis.

Pancreas 2008 March
Pancreatic pseudocysts are a well-known complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, with a higher incidence in the latter. Diagnosis is accomplished most often by computed tomographic scanning, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or by ultrasound, and a rapid progress in the improvement of diagnostic tools enables detection with high sensitivity and specificity. Different strategies contribute to the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts: endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. The feasibility of endoscopic drainage is highly dependent on the anatomy and topography of the pseudocyst, but provides high success and low complication rates. Percutaneous drainage is used for infected pseudocysts. However, its usefulness in chronic pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts is questionable. Internal drainage and pseudocyst resection are frequently used as surgical approaches with a good overall outcome, but a somewhat higher morbidity and mortality compared with endoscopic intervention. We therefore conclude that pseudocyst treatment in chronic pancreatitis can be effectively achieved by both endoscopic and surgical means. This review entails publications referring to the classification of pancreatic pseudocysts, epidemiology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic options for pancreatic pseudocysts. Only full articles were considered for the review. Based on a search in PubMed, the MeSH terms "pancreatic pseudocysts and classification," "diagnosis," and "endoscopic, percutaneous, and surgical treatment" were used either alone or in combination.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app