Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
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Association of Parkinson's disease with accelerated bone loss, fractures and mortality in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

UNLABELLED: Among community-dwelling older men, compared to those without Parkinson's disease (PD), over approximately 5 years, those with baseline PD had a significantly greater rate of annualized total hip bone loss (-1.1% vs. 0.4%), proportion of incident non-spine fractures (14.9% vs. 7.2%) and mortality (34.8% vs. 9.5%).

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to examine the association of Parkinson's disease (PD) with bone loss and fractures in older men.

METHODS: This prospective cohort study analyzed data from 5,937 community dwelling men aged >or=65 years at six clinical centers of the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) Study. At baseline and visit two (mean interval 4.6 +/-0.4 SD years), community-diagnosed PD was ascertained by self-report and hip bone mineral density (BMD) was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Incident fractures were self-reported. Fractures and deaths were centrally adjudicated.

RESULTS: At baseline, 46 (0.8%) men had PD. Age-adjusted mean annualized total hip bone loss was greater in men with vs. those without PD (-1.08% vs. -0.36%, p < 0.001). 15.2% of men with PD and 7.2% of men without PD experienced an incident non-spine fracture (age-adjusted HR 2.4, 95%CI 1.1-5.0). 34.8% of men with PD and 9.5% of men without PD died during follow-up (age-adjusted HR 3.5, 95%CI 2.2-5.5). Associations of PD with bone loss, fractures and mortality were modestly altered by additional individual adjustment for possible confounders.

CONCLUSIONS: In community-dwelling older men, PD was associated with increased bone loss, fractures and mortality. In addition to implementing fall prevention measures, clinicians should consider osteoporosis screening in older men with PD.

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