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Recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema: eleven pediatric cases.

BACKGROUND: Recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema is a cutaneous disease mediated by superantigens made by staphylococci and streptococci, which, to our knowledge, has only been reported in young adults. We describe recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema in 11 children and outline the differences between recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema and Kawasaki disease in this age range.

OBSERVATIONS: Eleven children (7 male and 4 female) presented with the sudden appearance of asymptomatic erythema, which was salmonlike in color and rapidly desquamating, involving the perineum in 10 patients and extending to the perianal area in 1 patient. At the onset of the rash, all patients were in good health, although 9 had mild fever for 1 to 2 days before its appearance. Physical examination also revealed an erythema of the hands and feet in 4 patients and strawberry tongue in 7. Two patients had a facial impetigo, and another showed a perianal streptococcal dermatitis. A group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus was isolated from the throat in 10 cases and from a perianal culture in 1 case. In 8 cases, resolution was spontaneous, but all patients were treated with systemic antimicrobial therapy for 10 days. Three patients had a personal history of cutaneous rashes on the perineal area during the last years before consultation. Rash recurrence was observed in 3 of the 11 patients at the follow-up examination. Conclusion Recurrent toxin-mediated perineal erythema can be observed not only in young adults but also in childhood.

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