JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Cerebral changes in SLE with or without antiphospholipid syndrome. a case-control MRI study.

BACKGROUND: To determine and characterize the prevalence of cerebral changes on MRI in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APLS) within systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

METHODS: Seventy-one patients with SLE were prospectively studied with brain MRI: 32 with definite APLS and 39 without. Atrophy, ventricular enlargement, leukoaraiosis, interuncal distance, Evans' index, infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) were analyzed. Demographic data, treatment, and SLE activity were analyzed.

RESULTS: Groups were similar in age (32.4 vs. 32.8 years old; P= non-significant [NS]), and gender. Duration of disease was longer in patients with APLS (87.3 vs. 55.4 months; P= .064). Cortical atrophy was common in both groups (68.7% vs. 89.7%; P= NS). Leukoaraiosis was present in only 3 patients (9.4%; P= .08), all in the APLS group. WMH were found in more than 40% of the patients from both groups. Infarcts (21.9% vs. 2.6%; P= .019) and infarcts plus WHM (12.5% vs. 0; P= .037) were more common in patients with APLS.

CONCLUSIONS: Although a higher prevalence of neurological involvement in SLE has been reported in APLS patients, we found gross brain changes to be similar between groups. Strokes and leukoaraiosis were more common in the APLS group, consistent with the idea of an APLS-induced prothrombotic state.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app