Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The dysfunction of ATPases due to impaired mitochondrial respiration in phosgene-induced pulmonary edema.

Phosgene is a toxic gas that is widely used in modern industry, and its inhalation can cause severe pulmonary edema. There is no effective clinical treatment because the mechanism of phosgene-induced pulmonary edema still remains unclear. Many studies have demonstrated that the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase plays a critical role in clearing pulmonary edema and the inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein expression has been found in many other pulmonary edema models. In the present study, after the mice were exposed to phosgene, there was serious pulmonary edema, indicating the dysfunction of the ATPases in mice. However, in vitro enzyme study showed that there were increases in the activities of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase. Further investigation showed that the ATP content and mitochondrial respiratory control ratio (RCR) in the lungs decreased significantly. The oxidative stress product, malondialdehyde (MDA), increased while the antioxidants (GSH, SOD, and TAC) decreased significantly. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiration is the target of phosgene. The dysfunction of ATPases due to impaired mitochondrial respiration may be a new mechanism of phosgene-induced pulmonary edema.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app