Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Association between intussusception and tonsil disease in childhood.

Epidemiology 2008 January
BACKGROUND: Intussusception is the most common cause of intestinal obstruction in infancy and early childhood, but its etiology remains unknown. The present study analyzes whether some children with intussusception subsequently have a higher risk of tonsil disease, suggesting an enhanced tendency to lymphoid hyperplasia.

METHODS: This nationwide cohort study included all Danish children younger than age 15 years, who were born in 1977-2001 and diagnosed with intussusception at a hospital (n = 2018). The cohort was followed-up for tonsil disease in the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Health Security System.

RESULTS: A total of 172 children were identified with tonsil disease following intussusception. The risk of tonsil disease was 48% higher (95% confidence interval = 27%-72%) after intussusception compared with the general population of the same age. Age, sex, age at intussusception, and time since intussusception did not modify risk of tonsil disease. The risks of acute tonsillitis, chronic disease of the tonsils, and tonsillectomy were equally increased after intussusception.

CONCLUSIONS: Intussusception was associated with an increased risk of tonsil disease in childhood. Children with a general tendency to lymphoid hyperplasia may be at increased risk of intussusception.

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