Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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The increasing prevalence of metabolic syndrome among Finnish men and women over a decade.

OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to assess a 10-yr change in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) among Finnish men and women.

DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Two cross-sectional population surveys were performed in Finland in 1992 and 2002. A total of 3495 participants aged 45-64 yr were included in the analysis.

RESULTS: In both years the metabolic syndrome was more common among men than women. In men the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome tended to increase slightly between 1992 and 2002, from 48.8-52.6% (P=0.139) based on the NCEP definition, and from 51.4-55.6% based on the IDF definition (P=0.102). In women the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome increased significantly from 32.2-39.1% based on the NCEP definition (P=0.003), and from 38.0-45.3% based on the IDF definition (P=0.002). In both sexes the prevalence of high blood pressure decreased, but the abnormalities in glucose metabolism increased between 1992 and 2002. The prevalence of central obesity increased in women between 1992 and 2002.

CONCLUSIONS: In Finland the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, based both on the NCEP and IDF definitions, is higher in men than women. However, the increase in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, from 1992-2002, was significant only among women.

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