Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Coeliac disease: oral ulcer prevalence, assessment of risk and association with gluten-free diet in children.

AIMS: Oral mucosal lesions may be markers of chronic gastrointestinal disorders, such as those causing malabsorption. Our objectives were to assess the prevalence of recurrent oral aphthous-like ulcers in coeliac disease patients living in the Mediterranean area, and to evaluate the impact of a gluten-free diet.

METHODS: A test group of 269 patients (age range 3-17 years) with coeliac disease confirmed both serologically and histologically was compared with a control group of 575 otherwise clinically healthy subjects for the presence, or a positive history of aphthous-like ulcers. Coeliac disease patients with aphthous-like ulcers were re-evaluated 1-year after starting a gluten-free diet.

RESULTS: Aphthous-like ulcers were found significantly more frequently in coeliac disease, in 22.7% (61/269) of patients with coeliac disease versus 7.1% (41/575) of controls (p=<0.0001; chi-square=41.687; odds ratio=4.3123; 95% confidence interval=2.7664:6.722). Most coeliac disease patients with aphthous-like ulcers and adhering strictly to gluten-free diet (71.7%; 33/46) reported significant improvement on gluten-free diet, with no or reduced episodes of aphthous-like ulcers (p=0.0003; chi-square=13.101; odds ratio=24.67; 95% confidence interval=2.63:231.441).

CONCLUSIONS: The epidemiological association found between coeliac disease and aphthous-like ulcers suggests that recurrent aphthous-like ulcers should be considered a risk indicator for coeliac disease, and that gluten-free diet leads to ulcer amelioration.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app