Consensus Development Conference
Journal Article
Practice Guideline
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Consensus guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adults with GH deficiency II: a statement of the GH Research Society in association with the European Society for Pediatric Endocrinology, Lawson Wilkins Society, European Society of Endocrinology, Japan Endocrine Society, and Endocrine Society of Australia.

OBJECTIVE: The GH Research Society held a Consensus Workshop in Sydney, Australia, 2007 to incorporate the important advances in the management of GH deficiency (GHD) in adults, which have taken place since the inaugural 1997 Consensus Workshop.

METHOD: Two commissioned review papers, previously published Consensus Statements of the Society and key questions were circulated before the Workshop, which comprised a rigorous structure of review with breakout discussion groups. A writing group transcribed the summary group reports for drafting in a plenary forum on the last day. All participants were sent a polished draft for additional comments and gave signed approval to the final revision.

CONCLUSION: Testing for GHD should be extended from hypothalamic-pituitary disease and cranial irradiation to include traumatic brain injury. Testing may indicate isolated GHD; however, idiopathic isolated GHD occurring de novo in the adult is not a recognized entity. The insulin tolerance test, combined administration of GHRH with arginine or growth hormone-releasing peptide, and glucagon are validated GH stimulation tests in the adult. A low IGF-I is a reliable diagnostic indicator of GHD in the presence of hypopituitarism, but a normal IGF-I does not rule out GHD. GH status should be reevaluated in the transition age for continued treatment to complete somatic development. Interaction of GH with other axes may influence thyroid, glucocorticoid, and sex hormone requirements. Response should be assessed clinically by monitoring biochemistry, body composition, and quality of life. There is no evidence that GH replacement increases the risk of tumor recurrence or de novo malignancy.

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