CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Development of sustained achlorhydria in a patient with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome treated with omeprazole.

Spontaneous remission of gastric acid hypersecretion in the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome occurs rarely. This study shows the development of gastric secretory mucosal atrophy resulting in achlorhydria and loss of pepsin secretion in a 63-year-old woman with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Reduced secretion began soon after starting treatment with omeprazole, and achlorhydria became complete 6 months later. The patient remains well with normal endoscopy results and is achlorhydric 4 years after the start of treatment and 34 months after stopping omeprazole. She was not colonized with Helicobacter pylori until 36 months after developing achlorhydria. Serum gastrin has increased from 1000 to between 5000 and 12,500 ng/L (pg/mL), was not suppressible by gastric acidification, and was not associated with G-cell hyperplasia. She also has a normal Schilling test and normal immunoglobulins, and lacks antibodies to parietal cells or H+, K(+)-ATPase. Moderate enterochromaffinlike cell hyperplasia is apparent for the first time on the latest biopsy sample.

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