Clinical Trial, Phase I
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
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Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment.

Desloratadine, a nonsedating histamine H(1)-receptor antagonist, is metabolized to 3-hydroxy (3-OH) desloratadine. Impaired hepatic function could result in increased exposure to desloratadine. This study assessed possible differences in the pharmacokinetics and safety of desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine in subjects (N = 21) with moderate hepatic dysfunction or normal liver function. Subjects were given desloratadine 5 mg once daily for 10 days and were assessed in several pharmacokinetic parameters. A similar degree of plasma protein binding to desloratadine and 3-OH desloratadine was observed in healthy volunteers and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment. All subjects with hepatic impairment were normal metabolizers. Three subjects with normal liver function, all African American, were identified as poor metabolizers. Exposure to desloratadine in the poor metabolizers was 2.6- to 6.5-fold greater than in other subjects with normal liver function. Eleven treatment-related adverse events, all mild to moderate in severity, were reported. Results suggest that subjects with moderate hepatic impairment experienced a greater increase in desloratadine exposure than subjects with normal liver function. Poor metabolizers had more exposure to desloratadine than normal metabolizers with or without hepatic impairment. Desloratadine administered at a daily dose of 5 mg was well tolerated.

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