CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., INTRAMURAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Markers in the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway and skin toxicity during erlotinib treatment.

BACKGROUND: Skin toxicity is a common adverse effect of erlotinib and other anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) agents. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between markers in the EGFR pathway and skin rash.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighteen patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with daily oral erlotinib at 150 mg. Skin biopsies were obtained at baseline and after 1 month of treatment in 15 patients. EGFR, phosphorylated EGFR (pEGFR), phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase (pMAPK), and phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) or Ki67 were examined quantitatively by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS: 11 of 18 (61%, 95% confidence interval 35.7% to 82.7%) patients developed skin rash. pAkt at baseline was significantly higher in patients with no rash than those with a grade 1 or 2 rash (18.8 +/- 8.3 versus 2.4 +/- 1.2 versus 3.3 +/- 3.3; P = 0.0017 for trend). There was a trend towards a significant increase of pMAPK in skin posttreatment with increasing grade of rash (no rash versus grade 1 versus grade 2 rash: 4.5 +/- 2.3 versus 8.4 +/- 4.2 versus 19.4 +/- 4.6; P = 0.036). Other markers were not associated with rash.

CONCLUSIONS: pAkt was significantly associated with not developing a rash and may have a predictive utility for skin toxicity in patients treated with erlotinib and possibly with other anti-EGFR agents.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app