CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) toxicity in pediatric patients: a case report.

BACKGROUND: Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone in sublingual tablet form, was recently approved in the United States for management of opioid dependence. Little information exists regarding the potential for opioid toxicity after Suboxone exposure in the pediatric population. We report a case of opioid toxicity after exposure to Suboxone in a pediatric patient and a review of other cases of pediatric Suboxone ingestion in the literature.

CASE: A previously healthy 2-year-old boy was found with 1 tablet of Suboxone (8 mg buprenorphine/2 mg naloxone) in his mouth. Remnants of the partly dissolved tablet were immediately removed from the child's oropharynx. The child experienced 1 episode of spontaneous emesis and became drowsy en route to the emergency department 30 minutes after the exposure. The patient was observed in the emergency department; no interventions were necessary, and the child was discharged asymptomatic and stable 6 hours post ingestion.

CONCLUSION: Suboxone, a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone, may produce opioid toxicity via sublingual absorption or ingestion by children. We present the case of a child with mild central nervous system depression after exposure to Suboxone. Pediatric case reports that demonstrate more significant central nervous system and respiratory depressant effects from Suboxone ingestion are emerging.

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