Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Management of meconium-related ileus in very low-birthweight infants.

BACKGROUND: Although administration of a water-soluble contrast enema has been recognized to be effective for meconium-related ileus, there have been no definitive management guidelines for very low-birthweight infants.

METHODS: Between 1998 and 2004, 10 infants without cystic fibrosis were treated for meconium-related ileus at Toyohashi Municipal Hospital. Their treatment and clinical course were reviewed retrospectively.

RESULTS: The average gestational age and birthweight of the 10 infants was 27 weeks and 788 g, respectively. The average age at initiation of treatment with a water-soluble contrast enema was 6.8 days. Intestinal obstruction was relieved by the enema in eight of 10 patients, while one underwent laparotomy and one died without any improvement of obstruction. In both neonates for whom the enema failed, rectal examination and rectal irrigation had been performed for several days before the enema was administered at the age of 14 and 15 days, respectively. In contrast, the enema was administered at the age of 1-11 days in neonates for whom this treatment was successful. Obstruction was relieved if the contrast medium reached the distal ileum, but enemas without reflux into the distal ileum failed to improve the obstruction. Contrast medium passed through the ileocecal valve to reach the distal ileum in all procedures done under fluoroscopy, but the medium failed to reach the ileum in most of the procedures done without fluoroscopy.

CONCLUSION: Although administration of water-soluble contrast enemas can be effective for meconium-related ileus, reflux into the terminal ileum is essential for bowel obstruction to improve, so it is desirable to perform the procedure under fluoroscopic guidance.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app