JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: symptoms are aggravated by cold and become less distressing with age and time.

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate how age and the duration of the condition influence the distress caused by the chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and to study how heat and cold influence the symptoms associated with CP/ CPPS as reported by patients afflicted with the condition.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-eight men (median age 50 years; age range 27-70 years) who had suffered from CP/CPPS for a duration ranging from 18 months to 40 years were included in the study. The evaluation included determination of the serum prostate-specific antigen level, the National Institutes of Health's Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS).

RESULTS: The mean NIH-CPSI score was 23.0 +/- 4.8. The mean IPSS was 14.3 +/- 7.2. Dysuria was reported by 30 men (63%) and ejaculatory pain by 22 (48%). Men with dysuria had painful ejaculations more often (60%) than men without (22%) (p <0.01). There was a strong negative correlation between age and the NIH-CPSI quality of life (QOL) score (correlation coefficient 0.646; p < 0.001). Independent of age, the duration of the disease also correlated with the NIH-CPSI QOL score (correlation coefficient -0.48; p < 0.02). The total NIH-CPSI score did not correlate with either age or the duration of the disease. Nearly every other man stated that the disease had started in association with a specific event, which for 15 men (31%) included exposure to cold. Forty men (83%) reported that cold caused symptom aggravation and/or induced a relapse. Thirty men (63%) stated that taking a hot bath and 22 (46%) reported that spending time in a hot climate decreased the symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS: Age, as well as the duration of the condition, influenced the distress induced by CP/CPPS, suggesting an improved coping ability with time as well as age. The ambient temperature appears to play a role as cold was frequently reported as causing symptom aggravation and heat was often reported to be ameliorating. The mechanisms behind this association between CP/CPPS and temperature as well as the correlation between ejaculatory pain and dysuria require further study.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app