Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical effectiveness of probiotics therapy (BIO-THREE) in patients with ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional therapy.

OBJECTIVE: Intestinal microflora has been implicated in the etiology of ulcerative colitis (UC). Over the past few years, the use of probiotics in UC has gained attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of probiotics therapy for mild to moderate distal UC refractory to conventional therapies.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty patients with mild to moderate distal UC took 9 BIO-THREE tablets per day for 4 weeks. Clinical symptoms and endoscopic findings were evaluated as ulcerative colitis disease activity index (UCDAI) scores before and after administration of BIO-THREE. Fecal samples were collected from all patients before and after probiotics administration, and fecal microflora was analyzed by the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) method.

RESULTS: Remission (UCDAI score < or =2) was observed in 45% (9/20) of the patients; response (decrease in UCDAI > or = 3, but final score > or = 3) in 10% (2/20); no response in 40% (8/20); and worsening (UCDAI > 3) in 5% (1/20). T-RFLP analysis indicated that the principal alteration in microflora was an increase in bifidobacteria.

CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that administration of BIO-THREE improved the clinical symptoms and endoscopic findings in patients with UC, indicating that administration of BIO-THREE is safe and efficacious for the treatment of UC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app