Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Detection of Hpdel among Thais, a deleted allele of the haptoglobin gene that causes congenital haptoglobin deficiency.

Transfusion 2007 December
BACKGROUND: Congenital haptoglobin deficiency is a risk factor for anaphylactic nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in Japan. The deleted allele of the haptoglobin gene, Hp(del), which causes congenital haptoglobin deficiency, has also been observed in other Northeast Asian populations, such as Korean and Chinese persons. It has not been reported in several African and European-African populations, however, or investigated in other countries.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: To investigate the distribution of congenital haptoglobin deficiency in Southeast Asian countries, blood samples collected from 200 randomly selected healthy Thai volunteers were analyzed for serum haptoglobin and the haptoglobin gene. Plasma haptoglobin concentration was measured to identify haptoglobin deficiency. Haptoglobin phenotyping was performed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting. The presence of the Hp(del) allele was determined with genomic DNA by an Hp(del)-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

RESULTS: There were no haptoglobin-deficient subjects detected among the 200 Thais. Their haptoglobin phenotypes were as follows: Hp 1-1 in 10, Hp 2-1 in 81, and Hp 2-2 in 109. Six individuals heterozygous for Hp(del) were detected. The frequency of the Hp(del) allele was calculated to be 0.015. The prevalence of haptoglobin deficiency caused by Hp(del) homozygosity was estimated to be approximately 1 in 4000.

CONCLUSION: Congenital haptoglobin deficiency caused by Hp(del) homozygosity is presumed to be present in Thailand as a risk factor for anaphylactic transfusion reactions with a frequency similar to that in Japan. The causative deleted allele of the haptoglobin gene, Hp(del), is distributed among Southeast Asian populations as well as among Northeast Asian populations.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app