COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Severity of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder versus noncombat-related posttraumatic stress disorder: a community-based study in American Indian and Hispanic veterans

Michael Brinker, Joseph Westermeyer, Paul Thuras, Jose Canive
Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 2007, 195 (8): 655-61
17700297
The goal of the study was to compare severity of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) versus noncombat-related PTSD in a group known to have high rates of combat-related PTSD. Sample consisted of 255 male American Indian and Hispanic veterans with lifetime PTSD who were contacted in communities in 2 regions of the country. Measures of PTSD severity included current posttraumatic symptoms, remission from lifetime PTSD, lifetime severity of alcohol-drug related problems, and mental health treatment history. Our findings revealed that veterans with combat-related PTSD had more severe posttraumatic symptoms, were less apt to have remitted from PTSD during the last year, and-contrary to expectation-were less apt to have sought mental health treatment since military duty. In conclusion, combat-related PTSD was more severe, as compared with noncombat-related PTSD, in this group, on 2 out of 5 measures. A low rate of mental health treatment since military duty may have contributed to increased symptoms and a lower remission rate.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
17700297
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"