Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Are one or two dangerous? Calcium channel blocker exposure in toddlers.

Unintentional pediatric ingestions of calcium channel blockers are increasing in frequency due to increased use of this antihypertensive class. Potential toxic effects include severe refractory hypotension and death; however, the true toxicity of unintentional pediatric ingestions of 1-2 pills is poorly defined. A literature review was conducted to more closely determine toxic and lethal dosages of calcium channel blockers in the pediatric population under 6 years of age. Results indicate that, although most accidental pediatric ingestions are asymptomatic, a small number do result in cardiovascular instability or even death. The dihydropyridines, particularly nifedipine, and the phenylalkylamine verapamil are most often implicated in symptomatic ingestions. There are no adequate data to identify which children are predisposed to illness, or to determine cutoffs for toxic dosages. However, ingestions of only one pill have been documented to cause severe symptoms, including death. Thus, emergency evaluation to assess potential toxicity is necessary, and gastrointestinal decontamination and in-hospital observation of at least 6 h after toxic ingestion for regular release medications, and 12-24 h after toxic ingestion for sustained release medications is recommended for all cases of unintentional calcium channel blocker ingestion in children younger than 6 years of age.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app