JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gender bias in jumping kinetics in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I basketball players

Mark S Walsh, Jeff A Waters, Harald Böhm, Jeff A Potteiger
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2007, 21 (3): 958-62
17685719
The purposes of this study are to examine gender differences in the contribution of the arm swing to jump height in men and women basketball players and to examine the role of upper-body strength in the contribution of arm swing to jump height. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I basketball players (men n = 13, women n = 12) performed 4 jumping movements: squat jumps with hands on hips (SNA) and with arm swings (SA) and countermovement jumps with hands on hips and with arm swings (CMA). Differences were found between the jump heights of men and women. Use of the arms increased the jump height of men more than women. Compared with the SNA, the SA allowed an increase of 7 cm (23%) for men and 4 cm (17%) for women. The CMA allowed for an increase of 10 cm (30%) for men and 6 cm (24%) for women. General upper-body strength measures did not correlate strongly with the effect of arms on jumping, but peak power did. As in previous studies, peak power had a high correlation with jumping performance. These results show that the arm swing contributes significantly to jump performance in both men and women basketball players and that strength training for jumping should focus on power production and lifting exercises that are jump specific.

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