JOURNAL ARTICLE

Nursing autonomy plays an important role in nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients

Mitsunori Miyashita, Yuko Nakai, Tomoyo Sasahara, Yurie Koyama, Yoichi Shimizu, Naoko Tsukamoto, Masako Kawa
American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care 2007, 24 (3): 202-10
17601844
The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship of nursing autonomy and other factors related to attitudes toward caring for dying patients. A cross-sectional survey of nurses was conducted in November 2003 using a self-administered questionnaire. We collected demographic data from 178 (75%) participants and used the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying scale, Form B, Japanese version (FATCOD-Form B-J), the Pankratz Nursing Questionnaire (PNQ), and the Death Attitude Inventory (DAI). FATCOD-Form B-J measures nurse's attitude toward caring for dying patients. It includes two subscales: positive attitude toward caring for the dying patient and perception of patient- and family-centered care. The PNQ measures nursing autonomy of individual nurses and has three subscales: nursing autonomy and advocacy, patients' rights, and rejection of traditional role limitations. The DAI measures attitudes toward death in context of Japanese cultural characteristics. It includes seven subscales: afterlife beliefs, death anxiety, death relief, death avoidance, life purpose, death concern, and supernatural beliefs. We investigated the factors associated with the FATCOD-Form B-J. Support of a mentor regarding end-of-life issues (beta = .19, P = .001), death avoidance domain of the DAI (beta = -.14, P = 0.03), life purpose domain of the DAI (beta = .23, P = .001), and rejection of traditional role limitations domain of the PNQ (beta = .51, P = .001) were selected as significant independent variables by multivariate analysis to evaluate nurses' positive attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Death anxiety domain of the DAI (beta = -.17, P = .02), patients' rights domain of the PNQ (beta =.46, P = .001), and rejection of traditional role limitations domain of the PNQ (beta = .34, P = .001) were selected as significant independent variables by multivariate analysis to evaluate the nurses' perception of patient-and family-centered care. In conclusion, nursing autonomy plays an important role in the attitudes of Japanese nurses who care for dying patients. Educational and administrative efforts to strengthen nursing autonomy are necessary.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
17601844
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"