Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
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Watson fundoplication in children: a comparative study with Nissen fundoplication.

BACKGROUND: Nissen fundoplication is the gold standard antireflux procedure in children. In 1996, one pediatric surgeon adopted the anterior fundoplication described by Watson in 1991. This procedure is reported to achieve good reflux control while permitting burping, active vomiting, and reducing gas bloat. An audit project was undertaken to compare the clinical outcome of children undergoing Nissen and Watson fundoplication.

METHODS: The case notes of 144 children undergoing open fundoplication between February 1995 and February 2002 were reviewed retrospectively.

RESULTS: Results of 72 boys and 59 girls comprising 76 Nissen and 55 Watson fundoplications were assessed. In each group, one death occurred within 1 month of operation. Chest infections occurred in 6.6% (Nissen) and 1.8% (Watson), and wound infections in 2.6% and 1.8%, respectively. Dysphagia was recorded in 7.9% of Nissen and 1.8% of Watson fundoplications. Follow-up data were analyzed in 70 children with Nissen and 48 children with Watson fundoplication. When overall clinical outcome was assessed for those patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year, 85.1% Nissen and 88.2% Watson were judged good/excellent; 14.9% Nissen and 11.8% Watson were judged poor/bad.

CONCLUSION: Watson fundoplication can safely be performed in children with comparable clinical outcome to Nissen fundoplication.

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