CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Recombinant human C1-inhibitor in the treatment of acute angioedema attacks.

Transfusion 2007 June
BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency have recurrent attacks of angioedema, preferably treated with C1-inhibitor concentrate. A recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rHuC1INH) was developed, derived from milk from transgenic rabbits. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of rHuC1INH in the treatment of acute angioedema attacks in patients with a hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients with hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency were treated with rHuC1INH (at a dose of 100 U/kg) within 8 hours after onset of an acute attack. Time to initiation of relief and time to minimal symptoms were reported by both the patient and the treating physician.

RESULTS: Thirteen severe angioedema attacks in 9 patients with hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency were treated with rHuC1INH. There was rapid improvement of clinical conditions for all attacks, with approximately 80 percent of treated patients experiencing symptom relief within 2 hours and minimal symptoms within 12 hours. There were no drug-related adverse events or immunogenic reactions to C1-inhibitor or rabbit proteins.

CONCLUSION: The transgenically produced rHuC1INH was successfully used in the treatment of acute angioedema attacks in patients with hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency.

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