JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Diffusion-weighted MRI in the body: applications and challenges in oncology

Dow-Mu Koh, David J Collins
AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology 2007, 188 (6): 1622-35
17515386

OBJECTIVE: In this article, we present the basic principles of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) that can aid radiologists in the qualitative and quantitative interpretation of DW images. However, a detailed discussion of the physics of DWI is beyond the scope of this article. A short discussion ensues on the technical aspects of performing DWI in the body. The emerging applications of DWI for tumor detection, tumor characterization, distinguishing tumor tissue from nontumor tissue, and monitoring and predicting treatment response are highlighted. The challenges to widespread adoption of the technique for cancer imaging in the body are discussed.

CONCLUSION: DWI derives its image contrast from differences in the motion of water molecules between tissues. Such imaging can be performed quickly without the need for the administration of exogenous contrast medium. The technique yields qualitative and quantitative information that reflects changes at a cellular level and provides unique insights about tumor cellularity and the integrity of cell membranes. Recent advances enable the technique to be widely applied for tumor evaluation in the abdomen and pelvis and have led to the development of whole-body DWI.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
17515386
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"

We want to hear from doctors like you!

Take a second to answer a survey question.