JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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Nosocomial fungal infections: epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

Invasive fungal infections are increasingly common in the nosocomial setting. Furthermore, because risk factors for these infections continue to increase in frequency, it is likely that nosocomial fungal infections will continue to increase in frequency in the coming decades. The predominant nosocomial fungal pathogens include Candida spp., Aspergillus spp., Mucorales, Fusarium spp., and other molds, including Scedosporium spp. These infections are difficult to diagnose and cause high morbidity and mortality despite antifungal therapy. Early initiation of effective antifungal therapy and reversal of underlying host defects remain the cornerstones of treatment for nosocomial fungal infections. In recent years, new antifungal agents have become available, resulting in a change in standard of care for many of these infections. Nevertheless, the mortality of nosocomial fungal infections remains high, and new therapeutic and preventative strategies are needed.

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