Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Consequences of treatment withdrawal in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Drug-related side effects are considered the major consequences of relapse and re-treatment in patients with autoimmune hepatitis. Our goals were to determine whether relapse is associated with disease progression and whether treatment end points can be refined.

METHODS: The outcomes of 132 patients with definite type 1 autoimmune hepatitis who had been treated comparably until remission were assessed retrospectively after drug withdrawal.

RESULTS: Patients who had relapsed repeatedly after initial treatment withdrawal developed cirrhosis more commonly than patients who sustained remission (18/48 vs 1/22, P=0.004), and those who relapsed once (18/48 vs 2/21, P=0.02). Hepatic death or the need for liver transplantation was also more frequent in the patients who had multiple relapses than those who sustained remission (13/64 vs 0/30, P=0.008) and those who relapsed once (13/64 vs 1/38, P=0.02). Patients who sustained their remission had a higher frequency of normal laboratory indices at drug withdrawal than patients who relapsed (88% vs 46%, P=0.003). Adverse outcomes after relapse did not distinguish patients until after 5 years of observation.

CONCLUSIONS: Multiple relapses are associated with a poorer prognosis than sustained remission or single relapse episodes. Initial treatment to resolution of laboratory abnormalities may afford the greatest opportunity to prevent relapse.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app