JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Transcriptional and functional analyses of SLC12A3 mutations: new clues for the pathogenesis of Gitelman syndrome.

Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a recessive salt-losing tubulopathy that is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the sodium-chloride co-transporter (NCC). GS is characterized by significant inter- and intrafamilial phenotype variability, with early onset and/or severe clinical manifestations in some patients. No correlations between the disease variability and the position/nature of SLC12A3 mutations have been investigated thus far. In this study, extensive mutational analyses of SLC12A3 were performed in 27 patients with GS, including genomic DNA sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, cDNA analysis, and quantification of allele-specific transcripts, in parallel with functional analyses in Xenopus laevis oocytes and detailed phenotyping. Twenty-six SLC12A3 mutations were identified in 25 patients with GS, including eight novel (detection rate 80%). Transcript analysis demonstrated that splicing mutations of SLC12A3 lead to frameshifted mRNA subject to degradation by nonsense-mediated decay. Heterologous expression documented a novel class of NCC mutants with defective intrinsic transport activity. A subgroup of patients presented with early onset, growth retardation, and/or detrimental manifestations, confirming the potential severity of GS. The mutations that were associated with a severe presentation were the combination at least for one allele of a missplicing resulting in a truncated transcript that was downregulated by nonsense-mediated decay or a nonfunctional, cell surface-absent mutant. The most recurrent mutation on the second allele was a newly described NCC mutant that affected the functional properties of the co-transporter. These data suggest that the nature/position of SLC12A3 mutation, combined with male gender, is a determinant factor in the severity of GS and provide new insights in the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of the disease.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app