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Transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate in patients undergoing radical cystoprostatectomy.

Journal of Urology 1992 January
To assess the impact of prostatic involvement with transitional cell carcinoma we reviewed the clinical outcome of 49 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the prostate. In addition, 115 step-sectioned cystoprostatectomy specimens removed for bladder transitional cell carcinoma were studied to determine the true incidence of secondary prostatic involvement by transitional cell carcinoma. Specimens from 300 prostates removed for prostatic adenocarcinoma also were reviewed to investigate the presence of incidental transitional cell carcinoma arising within the prostate. Transitional cell carcinoma was found in 29% of the step-sectioned specimens and in none of the radical prostatectomy specimens. The presence of prostatic invasion either into the stroma or involving prostatic ducts and acini only had no adverse effect on outcome. Lymph node status and bladder stage, and not prostatic invasion were the determining factors of survival. The presence of seminal vesicle involvement or prostatic stromal invasion appeared to predict for lymph node involvement. With a mean followup of more than 3 years 75% of our patients who had negative lymph nodes and low stage bladder lesions are alive without evidence of disease. In our series prostatic involvement by transitional cell carcinoma did not impact on survival when patients were treated aggressively with radical cystoprostatectomy.

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