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Sleeve gastrectomy in the high-risk patient.

Obesity Surgery 2006 November
BACKGROUND: One of the surgical options available for the super-obese patient is the sleeve gastrectomy. We present results of this operation in a series of 118 patients.

METHODS: The charts of all patients who have had the sleeve gastrectomy performed were reviewed for demographic data, complications, weight, and nutritional parameters.

RESULTS: Median age was 47 years (16-70). Median BMI was 55 kg/m(2) (37-108), with 73% of patients having a BMI > or =50 kg/m(2). 41% of the patients were male. The operation was performed by laparotomy in all but three cases, which were performed laparoscopically. Median hospital stay was 6 days (3-59). There was one perioperative death (0.85%). 18 patients (15.3%) had postoperative complications. Median percent excess weight loss was 37.8% at 6 months, 49.4% at 12 months, and 47.3% at 24 months. Median follow-up was 13 months (1-66). At 1 year postoperatively, the percentage of patients with normal serum levels of albumin was 100%, hemoglobin 86.1%, and calcium 87.2%, compared to 98.1%, 85.6%, and 94.3% preoperatively. 6 patients requested conversion to a duodenal switch during the follow-up period; all left the hospital in 4-6 days without major complication.

CONCLUSIONS: Although the sleeve gastrectomy does not result in as much weight loss as the duodenal switch or gastric bypass, it can be used as a stand-alone operation or as a bridge to more complex procedures in the high-risk super-obese patient.

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