JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW

Update on endovascular therapies for cerebral vasospasm induced by aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

Christina M Sayama, James K Liu, William T Couldwell
Neurosurgical Focus 2006, 21 (3): E12
17029336
Cerebral vasospasm remains a major source of morbidity and death in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). When vasospasm becomes refractory to maximal medical management consisting of induced hypertension and hypervolemia and administration of calcium channel antagonists, endovascular therapies should be considered. The primary goal of endovascular treatment is to increase cerebral blood flow to prevent cerebral infarction. Two of the more frequently studied endovascular treatments are transluminal balloon angioplasty and intraarterial papaverine infusion. These two have been used either alone or in combination for the treatment of vasospasm. Other pharmacological vasodilating agents currently being investigated are intraarterial nimodipine, nicardipine, verapamil, and milrinone. Newer intraarterial agents, such as fasudil and colforsin daropate, have also been investigated. In this article the authors review the current options in terms of endovascular therapies for treatment of cerebral vasospasm. The mechanism of action, technique of administration, clinical effect and outcomes, and complications of each modality are discussed.

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