Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Microbiology of peritonsillar abscesses.

AIM: The objective of the present study was to analyze the microbiology of peritonsillar abscesses.

METHODS: Thirty patients, mean age 24,2 years, with peritonsillar abscesses underwent aspiration of at least 3 mL of pus, which was cultured for aerobes and anaerobes.

RESULTS: 87% samples showed positive cultures. Aerobic or facultative aerobic bacteria were isolated from 23% aspirates, mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria from 60%, and anaerobic bacteria from only 3% aspirate. A total of 69 bacterial isolates (34 aerobic and 35 anaerobic) were recovered. The most common aerobic isolate was Streptococcus sp, with Streptococcus pyogenes being identified in 23% of aspirates. The predominant anaerobic isolates were Prevotella sp and Peptostreptococcus sp. Patients had received previous antimicrobial therapy in 63% cases. In this group, 1.8 isolates per specimen were recovered, a lower number than in the untreated group (3.0 per specimen). No significant difference in the species isolated was observed between these two groups.

CONCLUSION: Peritonsillar abscess is usually a polymicrobial infection, with predominance of anaerobic bacteria. The number of agents isolated was larger in patients not previously treated with antibiotics, but the use of antimicrobial drugs did not interfere with the type of bacterium isolated.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app