JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Mutations in the BH4-metabolizing genes GTP cyclohydrolase I, 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase, sepiapterin reductase, carbinolamine-4a-dehydratase, and dihydropteridine reductase.

Human Mutation 2006 September
Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) deficiencies are a highly heterogeneous group of disorders with several hundred patients, and so far a total of 193 different mutant alleles or molecular lesions identified in the GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS), sepiapterin reductase (SR), carbinolamine-4a-dehydratase (PCD), or dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) genes. The spectrum of mutations causing a reduction in one of the three biosynthetic (GTPCH, PTPS, and SR) or the two regenerating enzymes (PCD and DHPR) is tabulated and reviewed. Furthermore, current genomic variations or SNPs are also compiled. Mutations in GCH1 are scattered over the entire gene, and only 5 out of 104 mutant alleles, present in a homozygous state, are reported to cause the autosomal recessive form of inheritable hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) associated with monoamine neurotransmitter deficiency. Almost all other 99 different mutant alleles in GCH1 are observed together with a wild-type allele and cause Dopa-responsive dystonia (DRD, Segawa disease) in a dominant fashion with reduced penetrance. Compound heterozygous or homozygous mutations are spread over the entire genes for PTS with 44 mutant alleles, for PCBD with nine mutant alleles, and for QDPR with 29 mutant alleles. These mutations cause an autosomal recessive inherited form of HPA, mostly accompanied by a deficiency of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Lack of sepiapterin reductase activity, an autosomal recessive variant of BH(4) deficiency presenting without HPA, was diagnosed in patients with seven different mutant alleles in the SPR gene in exons 2 or 3 or in intron 2. Details on all mutations presented here are constantly updated in the BIOMDB database (www.bh4.org).

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app