CLINICAL TRIAL, PHASE II
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Botulinum toxin A for neuropathic pain after neck dissection: a dose-finding study.

Laryngoscope 2006 July
OBJECTIVES: Botulinum toxin type A (BtxA) has been reported to be feasible in chronic neuropathic pain after neck dissection. The impact of the dose on the outcome has not been investigated yet.

STUDY DESIGN: Twenty-three patients with neuropathic pain after neck dissection were selected for an open and prospective phase II trial.

METHODS: In the low-dose group (n=13), a concentration of 10 mouse units (MU)/0.1 mL saline and in the high-dose-group (n=10), a concentration of 20 MU/0.1 mL saline were injected subcutaneously. Pain and quality of life were assessed at day 0 and day 28, respectively, by visual analog scales (VAS) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality-of-life core and EORTC quality-of-life head and neck module questionnaires.

RESULTS: Patients in the low-dose group showed a significant pain reduction (VAS) from 4.3 at day 0 to 3.0 at day 28 (P<.05). The mean pain VAS values in the high-dose group did not improve significantly. No serious adverse events were observed. There were trends toward improvement in quality of life in the low-dose group.

CONCLUSIONS: BtxA in a low concentration seems to be a useful therapeutic option in chronic neuropathic pain of the neck and shoulder after neck dissection.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app