JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Proven startle-provoked epileptic seizures in childhood: semiologic and electrophysiologic variability.

Epilepsia 2006 June
PURPOSE: To delineate further the clinical and electrophysiologic features of proven startle-provoked epileptic seizures (SPESs) in children.

METHODS: Clinical, neuroradiologic, and neurophysiologic data of 22 consecutive patients with SPESs were analyzed. Eighty-nine SPESs were documented by video-EEG and evaluated with respect to semiology and ictal and interictal EEG findings.

RESULTS: Mean age was 68 months (10-178 months). Most children had severe mental retardation (86%). Neuroimaging demonstrated diffuse cerebral abnormalities in 15 of 19. Somatosensory evoked potentials revealed cortical abnormalities in 10 of 13 children. The underlying causes were heterogeneous. Only two patients were normally developed. Seizure frequency was usually high (>10/day). Two children had less frequent SPESs (two per month; two per week). Seizures were easily precipitated by sudden sound (n=15), unexpected touch (n=3), or both (n=4). The most common semiologic findings (50%) were generalized tonic seizures or those characterized by a predominant tonic phase, followed in frequency by myoclonic seizures (36%), which were generalized in seven, and unilateral in one. Generalized clonic seizures were observed in one. A complex seizure spread was documented in two children. The most common ictal EEG finding (60%) was a diffuse electrodecremental pattern (DEP). Generalized spike/polyspike waves were found in five and focal discharges in four.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that startle epilepsy is not a uniform epileptic entity. We were able to demonstrate a number of distinct patterns of SPESs, characterized by clinical, semiologic, and electrophysiologic features. Considering the high diversity of SPES patients, a common underlying pathophysiologic mechanism seems unlikely.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app