COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Novel ubiquitin neuropathology in frontotemporal dementia with valosin-containing protein gene mutations.

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with inclusion body myopathy and Paget disease of bone (IBMPFD) is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene, a member of the AAA-ATPase gene superfamily. The neuropathology associated with sporadic FTD is heterogeneous and includes tauopathies and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). However, there is limited information on the neuropathology in IBMPFD. We performed a detailed, systematic analysis of the neuropathologic changes in 8 patients with VCP mutations. A novel pattern of ubiquitin pathology was identified in IBMPFD that was distinct from sporadic and familial FTLD-U without VCP gene mutations. This was characterized by ubiquitin-positive neuronal intranuclear inclusions and dystrophic neurites. In contrast to FTLD-U, only rare intracytoplasmic inclusions were identified. The ubiquitin pathology was abundant in the neocortex, less robust in limbic and subcortical nuclei, and absent in the dentate gyrus. Only rare inclusions were detected with antibodies to VCP and there was no biochemical alteration in the VCP protein. VCP is associated with a variety of cellular activities, including regulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the pathology associated with VCP gene mutations is the result of impairment of ubiquitin-based degradation pathways.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app