Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Sudden traumatic death in children: "we did everything, but your child didn't survive".

JAMA 2006 June 15
When caring for children who become suddenly and catastrophically ill, clinicians must simultaneously attend to a complex and rapidly evolving medical situation, as well as to the equally challenging demands of establishing compassionate relationships with family members and communicating well with colleagues. An 18-month-old toddler was brought to the hospital with severe head injury after being struck by a car. Over a period of hours, her condition evolved from prognostic uncertainty to the diagnosis of brain death and considerations of organ donation. Against this medical backdrop, the clinicians successfully established a trusting relationship with family members by careful attention to their emotional, informational, and care needs as they absorbed the devastating prognosis, took in the results of the brain death examination, and considered the option of organ donation. This case illustrates the importance of interdisciplinary communication, the vital role of social workers and other psychosocial providers with expertise in working with families, and the critical significance of mutual care and support for the clinicians who accompany families through these tragic life events.

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