JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Induction of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase to prevent the nonthyroidal illness syndrome in mice.

Endocrinology 2006 July
Essentially all serious illness is associated with a decrease in circulating T(3), a condition known as the nonthyroidal illness syndrome. Substantial evidence suggests that a contributing factor to this syndrome is a cytokine-induced decrease in hepatic type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase (D1), an enzyme that converts T(4) to T(3). The type 1 deiodinase is induced at the transcriptional level by T(3), but illness-associated cytokines block this induction, resulting in decreased T(3) and hence a further decline in D1 expression. We demonstrated that IL-1 blocks the ability of T(3) to induce D1 in rat hepatocyte primary cultures and that forced expression of steroid receptor co- activator 1 (SRC-1) prevents this cytokine effect. This led us to test whether forced hepatic expression of SRC-1 can prevent the nonthyroidal illness syndrome in vivo. Pretreatment of endotoxin-treated mice with an adenovirus that expresses SRC-1, compared with a control adenovirus, prevented the endotoxin-induced decreases in hepatic D1 and plasma T(3). The data suggest that a cytokine-induced defect in T(3) receptor coactivators is an important component of this animal model of nonthyroidal illness and that the syndrome can be overcome by forced expression of the coactivator.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app