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Early ovarian cancer: 3-D power Doppler.

Abdominal Imaging 2006 September
Transvaginal sonography plays an important role in the assessment of the morphology of ovarian lesions. However, the accuracy of the technique is limited due to the significant number of false-positive results. Color Doppler imaging and pulsed Doppler spectral analysis enable evaluation of ovarian tumor blood flow, analysis of the distribution of blood vessels, and quantitative measurement of blood flow velocity waveforms. These parameters increase the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound evaluation of ovarian tumors. Unfortunately, there is no consensus as to which Doppler parameters and cutoff values are the most predictive of malignancy. Three-dimensional (3-D) power Doppler ultrasound provides a new tool to evaluate features of tumor vascularity. Three-dimensional ultrasound and 3-D power Doppler imaging in patients with "positive" findings on standard ultrasound tests, which encompass annual gray-scale transvaginal sonography followed by transvaginal color Doppler ultrasound in selected cases, represent a novel approach for early and accurate detection of ovarian cancer through screening. Combined evaluations of morphology and neovascularity by 3-D power Doppler ultrasound may improve early detection of ovarian carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced 3-D power Doppler sonography facilitates visualization of adnexal tumor vessels, which may aid in differentiating benign from malignant adnexal lesions.

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