Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Myeloid cells in infantile hemangioma.

Little is known about the pathogenesis of infantile hemangiomas despite the fact that they are relatively common tumors. These benign neoplasms occur in as many as 1 in 10 births, and although rarely life threatening, hemangiomas can pose serious concerns to the cosmetic and psychosocial development of the afflicted child. Ulceration, scarring, and disfigurement are significant problems as are encroachment of the ear and eye, which can threaten hearing and vision. The precise mechanisms controlling the rapid growth observed in the first months of life and the spontaneous involution that follows throughout the course of years remain unknown. In this report we demonstrate the presence of large numbers of hematopoietic cells of the myeloid lineage in proliferating hemangiomas and propose a mechanism for the observed evolution of these lesions that is triggered by hypoxia and involves the participation of myeloid cells. We report the results of experiments using myeloid markers (CD83, CD32, CD14, CD15) that unexpectedly co-labeled hemangioma endothelial cells, providing new evidence that these cells are distinct from normal endothelium.

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