COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical presentation and delayed treatment of cholangitis in older people.

Acute cholangitis is more common in older people, and increasing age is a determinant of morbidity and mortality, as is early biliary decompression by ERCP. This study aims to identify factors that may contribute to delays in the diagnosis and treatment of older people with acute cholangitis. Case notes of 122 patients (45 aged < 75 years, 77 > 75 years) with a final diagnosis of acute cholangitis who underwent ERCP were reviewed for presenting clinical features (pain, jaundice, rigors, fever, falls, incontinence, confusion), liver function tests, blood count, and the interval from admission to diagnosis, ultrasonography, and ERCP. The most common symptom at presentation was abdominal pain (81%), followed by jaundice (55%). These symptoms were no less common in older patients. Charcot's triad was present in only 15.6% of young and 18.8% of older patients. Jaundice was not detected in 16% of significantly hyperbilirubinemic older patients, but only the presence of functional symptoms was associated with significant diagnostic delay (median, 1 day [range: 0-11] vs. 9.5 days [3-25]; P< 0.001) and delay in performing ERCP (median: 4 days [0-24] vs. 16.5 days [2-29], P< 0.001). Overall mortality was 10%, and the incidence of septic shock was similar in both groups. Charcot's classical triad is infrequent in patients suffering from acute cholangitis. Given the greater difficulty assessing jaundice in older people and the confounding effect of falls, incontinence, and confusion, a routine policy of liver function tests, with further investigation of abnormal results in such presentations, may reduce delays in diagnosing and treating acute cholangitis.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app