Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Effects of lamotrigine on the symptoms and life qualities of patients with post polio syndrome: a randomized, controlled study.

The aim of this study is to find out if lamotrigine gives symptomatic relief and enhances quality of life in patients with post-polio syndrome. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to receive or not to receive lamotrigine treatment. Lamotrigine at a daily dose of 50-100 mg was given to the fifteen patients, and fifteen patients were used as the control group. Interventional advice and home exercises were given to all of the patients. Clinical assessments were made at baseline and repeated at the second and fourth weeks by the physician who was unaware of medication. The severity of pain, fatigue and muscle cramps were rated on a visual analogue scale. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Nottingham Health Profile. The patient's perceived level of fatigue was assessed using Fatigue Severity Scale. Comparing to the baseline values, statistically significant improvements were obtained in the mean scores of VAS, NHP and FSS at two weeks and four weeks in the patients on lamotrigine. No significant improvements were reported in the control group. These preliminary results indicate that lamotrigine relieves the symptoms and improves the life qualities of patients with post polio syndrome.

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