OPEN IN READ APP
COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

Thoracic epidural versus intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after cardiac surgery: a randomized controlled trial on length of hospital stay and patient-perceived quality of recovery

Vigdis Hansdottir, Julia Philip, Monika Fagevik Olsen, Christina Eduard, Erik Houltz, Sven-Erik Ricksten
Anesthesiology 2006, 104 (1): 142-51
16394700

BACKGROUND: Perioperative thoracic epidural analgesia reduces stress response and pain scores and may improve outcome after cardiac surgery. This prospective, randomized trial was designed to compare the effectiveness of patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia with patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine on postoperative hospital length of stay and patients' perception of their quality of recovery after cardiac surgery.

METHODS: One hundred thirteen patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were randomly assigned to receive either combined thoracic epidural analgesia and general anesthesia followed by patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia or general anesthesia followed by to patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine. Postoperative length of stay, time to eligibility for hospital discharge, pain and sedation scores, degree of ambulation, lung volumes, and organ morbidities were evaluated. A validated quality of recovery score was used to measure postoperative health status.

RESULTS: Length of stay and time to eligibility for hospital discharge were similar between the groups. Study groups differed neither in postoperative global quality of recovery score nor in five dimensions of quality of recovery score. Time to extubation was shorter (P < 0.001) and consumption of anesthetics was lower in the patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia group. Pain relief, degree of sedation, ambulation, and lung volumes were similar between the study groups. There was a trend for lower incidences of pneumonia (P = 0.085) and confusion (P = 0.10) in the patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia group, whereas cardiac, renal, and neurologic outcomes were similar between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS: In elective cardiac surgery, thoracic epidural analgesia combined with general anesthesia followed by patient-controlled thoracic epidural analgesia offers no major advantage with respect to hospital length of stay, quality of recovery, or morbidity when compared with general anesthesia alone followed by to patient-controlled analgesia with intravenous morphine.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
16394700
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"