Clinical Trial
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Diagnosis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 plasma antigen levels: a prospective analysis in 350 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell recipients.

Transplantation 2005 November 28
BACKGROUND: Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is one of the most serious complications following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with a high mortality. We conducted a large trial in order to investigate the value of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) plasma antigen levels in VOD patients as PAI-1 has been described as a possible diagnostic marker of VOD.

METHODS: In all, 350 stem cell recipients were included in our study. PAI-1 levels were analyzed prior to conditioning therapy and then weekly until eight weeks after HSCT. Transplantation-related complications (TRC) including VOD, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were recorded weekly throughout the study.

RESULTS: Maximum PAI-1 antigen levels were increased in all patients with VOD (n=15; mean 248 ng/ml; 95% CI 183-314 ng/ml). Maximum PAI-1 levels above 120 ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 30.6% for VOD after HSCT.

CONCLUSION: Our study underlines that maximum PAI-1 plasma antigen levels not exceeding 120 ng/ml have a strong negative predictive value in the diagnosis of VOD and thus represent a helpful non-invasive tool for exclusion of VOD after HSCT.

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