Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Neuroimaging in drug and substance abuse part II: opioids and solvents.

The central nervous system is one of the primary targets for the detrimental effects of drugs of abuse. Diagnostic imaging, especially MRI, plays an important role in the detection of complications associated with drug abuse. We present the imaging findings associated with the abuse of opioids and other morphine derivatives, as well, as solvents. Of the morphine derivatives, heroin is the most commonly abused. Several CNS pathologic effects have been described in association with its abuse. These include neurovascular complications such as microvascular ischemic changes or ischemic stroke. A rare form of leukoencephalopathy has been described in those abusers who inhale heroin vapors. Other neurologic complications include atrophy and various infectious processes. Solvent inhalation is a common practice among adolescents and young adults secondary to its ease of access and low cost. The most important component of industrial solvents is toluene. Complications of toluene abuse may be either acute, showing no neuroradiological changes, or chronic, characterized by cerebral and cerebellar demyelination as well as atrophy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app