OPEN IN READ APP
COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE

Fatigue, menopausal symptoms, and cognitive function in women after adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer: 1- and 2-year follow-up of a prospective controlled study

Helen G Mar Fan, Nadine Houédé-Tchen, Qi-Long Yi, Irene Chemerynsky, Fiona P Downie, Kathryn Sabate, Ian F Tannock
Journal of Clinical Oncology 2005 November 1, 23 (31): 8025-32
16258100

PURPOSE: We previously evaluated fatigue, menopausal symptoms, and cognitive dysfunction in patients receiving adjuvant therapy for breast cancer and matched healthy women. Here we report assessment of these women 1 and 2 years later.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients without relapse and controls were evaluated by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-General Quality of Life questionnaire, with subscales for fatigue and endocrine symptoms, and by the High Sensitivity Cognitive Screen.

RESULTS: There were 104, 91, and 83 patients and 102, 81, and 81 controls assessed at baseline and at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Median Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-Fatigue scores (range, 0 to 52) for patients improved from 31 (on chemotherapy) to 43 and 45 at 1 and 2 years, respectively, but were stable in controls (46 to 48). Median Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-Endocrine Symptoms scores (range, 0 to 72) for patients improved from 57 (on chemotherapy) to 59 and 61 at 1 and 2 years, respectively, and were stable in controls (64 to 65). Differences between patients and controls remained significant for these scales. The incidence of moderate-severe cognitive dysfunction by the High Sensitivity Cognitive Screen decreased in patients from 16% (on chemotherapy) to 4.4% and 3.8% and in controls from 5% to 3.6% and 0% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. There were minimal differences between estrogen receptor-positive patients who started hormonal therapy (mainly tamoxifen) after chemotherapy and estrogen receptor-negative patients who did not. Differences in quality of life between patients and controls were significant only at baseline.

CONCLUSION: Fatigue, menopausal symptoms, and cognitive dysfunction are important adverse effects of chemotherapy that improve in most patients. Hormonal treatment has minimal impact on them.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Related Papers

Available on the App Store

Available on the Play Store
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
16258100
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"