ENGLISH ABSTRACT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
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[Traumatic glaucoma--a survey].

Traumatic glaucomas represent a very heterogeneous group of entities due to a variety of pathomechanisms which increase the intraocular pressure in the early or late phase after traumatic injury (blunt or penetrating injury, acid or alkali burn). Little is known about the real prevalence of traumatic glaucoma. Angle recession, hyphema-associated and lens-associated mechanisms are the most common causes of traumatic glaucoma after blunt ocular trauma. Secondary angle closure due to peripheral anterior synechiae is the most common pathomechanism leading to glaucoma in patients with penetrating eye injury or acid or alkali burn. Early anti-inflammatory therapy for eye injuries is the most important step in the prevention of traumatic glaucoma. Although no general recommendations exist, topical potent corticosteroids significantly decrease the risk of glaucoma development. Medical and surgical treatment of traumatic glaucoma has often been disappointing. Therefore the visual prognosis of these eyes is often restricted. Antiglaucomatous drugs that reduce the secretion of aqueous humor (e. g., beta-blockers) should be preferred. Mitomycin-augmented trabeculectomy is the surgical method of first choice in patients with open angle traumatic glaucoma. Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation represents the method of first choice in secondary angle closure glaucoma due to anterior peripheral synechiae. New surgical techniques will increase the possibilities of an effective reduction of the intraocular pressure in secondary angle closure glaucoma. These new procedures are endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation, retinectomy, and the implantation of drainage devices via the pars plana. Further evaluation and modifications of these surgical techniques should markedly improve the visual prognosis of eyes with secondary angle closure glaucoma. For a few types of traumatic glaucoma (e. g., after epithelial ingrowth) no effective treatment modality is available at present.

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