Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Dopamine receptor D2 gene polymorphisms are associated in Taiwanese children with Tourette syndrome.

Pediatric Neurology 2005 October
The pathophysiology of Tourette syndrome may involve the dopamine system. Dysfunction of the dopamine receptor D2 gene leads to many neuropsychiatric disorders. The objective of this study is to test the hypothesis that the dopamine receptor D2 gene may play a role in Tourette syndrome. A total of 151 children with Tourette syndrome and 183 normal control subjects were included in the study. Polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the Taq I DRD2 and DRD2 (H313H) polymorphisms of the dopamine receptor D2 gene. The genotype proportions of Taq I DRD2 and DRD2 (H313H) polymorphisms in the two groups were significantly different (P < 0.01 for both). The odds ratio for developing Tourette syndrome in individuals with the Taq I DRD2 A1 homozygote was 2.253 (95% confidence interval, 1.124-4.517) compared with individuals with the Taq I DRD2 A2 homozygote. The odds ratio for developing Tourette syndrome in individuals with the DRD2 (H313H) C homozygote was 2.96 (95% confidence interval, 1.398-6.269) compared with individuals with DRD2 (H313H) T homozygote. This study has demonstrated an association between the dopamine receptor D2 gene and Tourette syndrome. These data suggest that the dopamine receptor D2 gene or a closely linked gene might be one of the susceptibility factors for Tourette syndrome.

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