Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: necessity of postmaneuver patient restrictions.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo, resulting from migration of otoconia into the semicircular canals. Several treatment methods involving positioning maneuvers that return the otoconia to the utricle have been described. Following treatment, most patients are provided with a variety of activity restrictions. Previous studies suggest that, overall, BPPV treatment may be successful without these restrictions. The purpose of this study was to determine the necessity of postmaneuver restrictions using an experimental and control group with participants matched for age, gender, involved ear, and symptoms. A canalith repositioning maneuver was used to treat the BPPV. During postmaneuver instruction, the 21 participants assigned to the restricted group were provided with typical activity restrictions. Twenty-one participants assigned to the nonrestricted group were given no postmaneuver restrictions. Only one participant in the restricted group and two participants in the nonrestricted group were not clear at the one-week follow-up appointment. Results indicated that postmaneuver restrictions do not improve treatment efficacy.

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